Bedwells Boatyard in Walton on the Naze

This old boatyard and its neighbour at Walton tidal mill are the finest yards in east anglia…. I think

You may remember I was last there six years ago – some of the boats have changed – many are unmoved, unloved and entering genteel decline.

 

 

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This is about Dylan Winter's Blog, Sailing around Britain.

18 Responses to “Bedwells Boatyard in Walton on the Naze”

  1. 30 July, 2017 at 8:32 amStephen Mundane says:

    Great photos Dylan and some interesting boats. Something for everyone there, even me! I reckon I could just about afford that blue dinghy, though I’d probably need some oars…

    • 30 July, 2017 at 1:55 pmEd Bourgoine says:

      I think I could probably scrape together enough for a pair of oars… interested in a shared ownership? :)

  2. 30 July, 2017 at 7:25 pmefl2@msn.com says:

    Thanks for the boatyard tour. I like the white dutch cruiser with the tabernackled down mast and leeboards, also the junk rigged big dory. You’ve got a great eye. It’s enjoyable to learn what gets your notice as you wander about. Good luck with the rest of your summer boating. Down here on the U.S. gulf coast we have one foot tides and the water rarely ebbs all the way out on a mooring, so I am always fascinated and amazed when I see photos of how boaters operate with high and dry ebb tide slips and moorings. I wonder where to find an online source with guidelines on how to construct low tide mooring balancing poles (or whatever the correct terminology) to extend down the sides of a full keel sailboat when anchored in a place where the tide ebbs all the way out? Would appreciate anyone directing me to a possible source, thanks. Ed

    • 30 July, 2017 at 9:33 pmdylan winter says:

      Boat legs is what you are thinking of.

      here on the east coast where the mud is thick they are pretty useless. They just sink down into the mud and the boat falls over anyway.
      They are also bulky things to deal with and take up a lot of space on the sidedecks. Hence the number of twin and triple keelers. They don’t care what the bottom is like – hard or soft – it is all the same to them.

      D

  3. 1 August, 2017 at 1:06 ampeter c says:

    Thx D, pleased to see you still have the touch for boat porn.

  4. 1 August, 2017 at 5:33 pmIan Clarke says:

    The two dutch barges in the pond are owned by friends – the white one “Windotter” recently brought from Holland and has being having a makeover last few weeks ready for the East Coast old Gaffers cruise starting the end of next week. The mast was down to replace the running rigging – the boat itself is relatively new, built 1991. The work is being done by a local female boatbuilder, Petra Potassa.

  5. 2 August, 2017 at 11:53 amJohn says:

    Dylan, Lovely photos. Spent a couple of days in the backwaters two weekends ago. First time in there, loved it will be going back as soon as I can. Stayed in the marina at Tichmarsh which is OK apart from no cleats on the pontoons just loops! Big skys and stunning sunsets.

  6. 3 August, 2017 at 10:26 amJes Bates says:

    Enjoyed the selection. I saw a Corribee for sale there about 1/3 of the way down, any idea of the condition and price?

  7. 4 August, 2017 at 11:51 pmAquaplane says:

    How depressing. I hope all the nice boats are out sailing.

    Perhaps the prices are too cheap and crap old boats are just left to rot when they should really be disposed of. Dreams are dreams but there are some nightmares there.

  8. 8 August, 2017 at 5:53 pmRob Gray says:

    Colvic motorsailer on the hard in the photos. Looking very lonely. Not tempted?

    • 8 August, 2017 at 6:08 pmdylan winter says:

      Not at this stage of the game. They do not fall over when the water goes away – which is good – but I do not think that I can make them look nice on a camera.

      With fisher, if the engine goes pop I can replace it and get most of my money back. With a Colvic if the engine goes pop then I would never get my money back.

  9. 11 August, 2017 at 3:42 pmROB says:

    Hm. The Pig was not exactly pulchritudinous and I’m sure that we all respected her steadfast loyalty over her looks.

    You could cheaply service and overhaul any small engine in any boat prior to departure – and buy and give away a Colvic for less than the cost of re-engining a Fisher – admittedly a far more attractive yacht from the outside. Fishers seem stubbornly pricey. I guess because they are pretty – and well built.

    Don’t electrocute yourself on the bike …..

    Rob

  10. 29 September, 2017 at 6:01 amGiles says:

    OK – you caught me out. A shot of my boat on the hard in July – unforgivable… At least I got her sorted out for a brief but fabulous cruise of our wonderful rivers in August. If I get some time, some many layered winter sailing might be in the offing.

    I must be aware that you are sneaking about keeping an eye on us East Coast loafers.

    G

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